Elder Abuse Prevention

Elder Abuse Prevention Program

Elder abuse refers to intentional or neglectful acts by a caregiver or “trusted” individual that lead to, or may lead to, harm of a vulnerable elder.

KEY FACTS

How many elders are abused?

According to the Department of Justice, a minimum of 1 in 9 or 11% percent of Americans over age 60 have experienced some form of elder abuse in the past year.

How many cases go unreported?

For every one case of elder abuse, neglect, exploitation, or self-neglect reported to authorities, at least five more go unreported.

The Elder Abuse Prevention Program provides the older adult population with information and resources that enables seniors to be aware of and recognize the different forms of abuse, neglect and exploitation. Individuals who work with the aging population are educated on how to recognize signs and symptoms of abuse and the importance of reporting the information. Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation educational and outreach events include presentations and the distribution of information on Elder Abuse and Crime Prevention.

The mission of the Elder Abuse Prevention Program is to develop and enhance comprehensive and coordinated programs for the prevention and treatment of elder abuse, neglect and exploitation. Some of the basic information provided includes what signs or symptoms to look for when elder abuse is suspected; definitions of terms used when discussing elder abuse; how to report those cases; the Abuse Hotline number, 800-96-ABUSE/800-962-2873 and how to access resources through the Elder Helpline, 800-96-ELDER/800-963-5337.

Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation educational and outreach events include presentations and the distribution of information on Elder Abuse and Crime Prevention. Elder Abuse prevention information is:

  • Distributed at health fairs, exhibits, outreach efforts
  • Provided during educational presentations to seniors, caregivers, professionals  and the general public
  • Submitted to various media outlets
  • Presented at trainings attended by seniors, caregivers and  professionals
  • And through working with community agencies to ensure the information researches the intended audience

Links to resources on elder abuse prevention include: