Tai Chi – Moving for Better Balance

Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance is a group program that focuses on improving functional ability, such as balance and physical function, to reduce fall-related risks and frequency.

Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance is one of many evidenced-based interventions for the prevention of falls.  The Oregon Research Institute (ORI) developed Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance, which was tested and demonstrated effective in decreasing the number of falls, the risk of falling, and fear of falling.  The purpose is to improve functional balance and physical performance of community-dwelling older adults aged 60 and older, who can walk easily with or without assistive devices.

Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance is derived from the traditional 24-form Yang-style Tai Chi.  This Tai Chi style is a unique combination of eight single forms, arranged in a sequence that progresses from easy to more difficult.  The forms can be practiced separately or together.Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance challenges limitation in balance and gait.  The program addresses balance and gait through a set of controlled, progressively designed exercises.   The eight Tai Chi forms emphasize weight shifting, postural alignment and coordinated movements.  Synchronized breathing aligned with Tai Chi movements is integrated into the movement routine.

Health Benefits:

  • Improved social and mental wellness
  • Improved balance and physical functioning
  • Improved confidence in conducting daily activities
  • Reduced risk of falling and sustaining associated injuries
  • Maintained independence and improved quality of life

Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance was designed for instructors who had been trained by either, the developer of the program Fuzhong Li, PhD, or a Master Trainer.  Elder Options staff and volunteers, through funding provided by the Department of Elder Affairs, were trained by Dr. Li. Elder Options has offered free 12 week Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance classes to seniors in several counties since August, 2012.  The classes are taught by trained instructors in facilities such as senior centers, adult activity centers, or community centers.

Upcoming Classes & Who to Contact to Register

Questions?   Contact Betty Flagg at (352) 378-6649, ext 119, or via e-mail at flaggb@agingresources.org.